Vanderbilt Kennedy Center

Research Reports

A Key Question: Is More Better?

A Research Report for Families by Paul Yoder, Ph.D., Professor of Special Education and VKC Investigator (2012). Describes a study to find out whether daily or weekly treatment sessions were more helpful in improving the spoken vocabulary of young children with Down syndrome compared with children with a different cause of intellectual disability.

Early Findings From The Center on Secondary Education for Students with Autism Spectrum Disorders

A Research Report from Erik Carter, Ph.D., Professor of Special Education, on behalf of The Center on Secondary Education for Students with Autism Spectrum Disorders (CSESA). The CSESA is a five-year project funded by the U.S. Department of Education to develop a comprehensive program to meet the needs of high school students on the autism spectrum (csesa.fpg.unc.edu/). Researchers from six universities—including Vanderbilt—are collaborating with schools, families, community members, and adolescents with an autism spectrum disorder (ASD) to develop an effective, comprehensive intervention for high schools focused on the following areas: (a) social competence; (b) transition and families; (c) academics; (d) personal responsibility, independence, and self-management; and (e) professional development.

More is Better in Children With Down Syndrome

A Research Report for Families by Paul Yoder, Ph.D., Professor of Special Education and VKC Investigator (2012). Describes a study to find out whether daily or weekly treatment sessions were more helpful in improving the spoken vocabulary of young children with Down syndrome compared with children with a different cause of intellectual disability.

Understanding Aging in Down Syndrome: A First Step

A Research Report by Alexandra Key, Ph.D., Research Associate Professor of Hearing and Speech Sciences and Director of Vanderbilt Kennedy Center Psychophysiology Lab, and Elisabeth Dykens, Ph.D., Annette Schaffer Eskind Chair, Professor of Psychology, Psychiatry, and Pediatrics, and Director of Vanderbilt Kennedy Center