Vanderbilt Kennedy Center

Rachel Hundley, Ph.D.

Assistant Professor of Pediatrics, Division of Developmental Medicine; Assistant Professor of Psychiatry; Psychologist, Vanderbilt Kennedy Center Learning Assessment Clinic
Member

Contact Info

Phone
(615) 875-5495

Email
rachel.j.hundley@Vanderbilt.Edu

Address
11204 Doctor's Office Tower

Rachel Hundley, Ph.D.

Overview

Rachel Hundley is a clinical psychologist who specializes in the assessment and ongoing care for children with developmental disabilities, emotional and behavioral concerns, and autism spectrum disorders (ASD). While at Children's Hospital-Boston, she served as psychology director of the Autism Care Program within the Division of Developmental Medicine. At Vanderbilt, she has continued to provide state-of-the-art assessment, diagnosis, and intervention planning for children and adolescents through the Center for Child Development and soon through the Learning Assessment Clinic. She is committed to lifelong learning and to educating other clinicians and researchers in best practices for the assessment of children with disabilities.

As a trainer for the Autism Diagnostic Observation Schedule, she has taught this measure nationally and internationally. In clinical settings, she has mentored postdoctoral fellows in psychology as well as psychology graduate and undergraduate students. Her previous research has primarily focused on social development and developmental disabilities, including autism and genetic disorders. At Vanderbilt, she is contributing to a study assessing the cognitive, behavioral, and neural components of Angelman syndrome, Rett syndrome, and MeCP2 duplication, and to a study of sleep intervention for children with ASD. She is part of the Autism Treatment Network (ATN), and she represents Vanderbilt on the Behavioral Sciences Committee for the ATN. She will soon begin working with colleagues at Vanderbilt and in Boston to examine the efficacy of a new medicine designed to address neurodevelopment and abnormal movements in Angelman syndrome.