Tennessee Kindred Stories of Disability

A collection of stories from individuals with disabilities, families, friends, and disability service providers in Tennessee



32 Stories Found

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Results related to: 14 to 21 years

Leo (21), Autism, Davidson County

I am preparing myself to be a successful author by taking classes at Nashville State, planning new books before writing them, and occasionally meeting with writing coaches one-on-one to improve my writing. ”

Adam (18), ADHD, Montgomery County

Through his work, he can share his talent and help others. ”

William (18), Cerebral Palsy, Shelby County

In the future, William aims to coach wheelchair basketball and to be a mentor for children going through situations similar to his. ”

Justin (19), Intellectual Disability, Williamson County

People started knowing that I had initiative and worked hard. I stood up for myself and let them know the real me. ”

Haley (19), Intellectual Disability, Williamson County

The program teaches me how to live on my own when I am ready to move out of my parents’ house and move into an apartment of my own.”

Danny (19), Intellectual Disability, Davidson County

My goal is to work hard and try my best, I think. I want to maybe get a job someday. ”

Daniel (20), Asperger Syndrome, Rutherford County

The reason that I came to Vanderbilt was to get better, meet new friends, and learn something new.”

Stephen (17), Blind, Shelby County

Stephen is confident that he will find a job, but one of his biggest concerns is being turned down simply because of his vision impairment. ”

Elizabeth (18), Blind, Shelby County

She describes public school as a place that she went, accomplished her tasks, and hurried home. Wistfully, she explained the isolation she felt through her lack of participation in extra-curricular activities. ”

Wesley (18), Blind, Smith County

I don’t tell people I’m blind for starters. I don’t feel like it’s something they need to know. Type one people, when they do find out I’m blind, are just like, “Oh okay.” And then there’s type two, who instantly switch to baby mode, like I’m completely helpless. ”

Alex K (17), Blind, Jefferson County

People clearly treated him differently, and at times, it was very frustrating for Alex because he knew he was the same person he was before his diagnosis. ”

Richard (14), Asperger Syndrome, Davidson County

Un diferente cosa aquí en los Estados Unidos, es de los sordos están mejores que en de donde vive. Y por eso, no me ha regresado porque los sordos aquí son mucho mejores que en México. Y viven mucho mejor. ”

Jose (16), Autism, Rutherford County

My brother does get more attention, but it doesn’t like bug me as much because I know he’s special. But when I talk to his teachers they’ll be like, 'Well you have to treat him a little bit more normal because if not, he’s not going to get better.'”

Alex (18), Blind, Fayette County

I look at my disability and still consider myself lucky. I could have had so many other problems, and I just thank God every day.”

Maria (18), Blind, Davidson County

Like any other teenager, she loves her family but eagerly awaits full independence. ”

Christopher (18), Cerebral Palsy, Shelby County

It’s overwhelming to go to the school, and feel like you have to get down on your hands and knees and beg for services you know your children should have. ”

Lauren (21), Autism, Blount County

Why can’t schools treat people with disabilities like they have a future?”

Grayson (21), Cerebral Palsy, Cumberland County

After a certain point you say this is what we are. Let’s just be a family and let’s just live.”

Jennifer (21), Other, Hamblen County

There seems to be resources out there but unless you are lucky enough to have some other parent tell you, you will go for years without knowing what is available.”

Adelai (15), Intellectual Disability, Davidson County

In terms of educational instruction, Adelai’s IEP was ignored.”