Tennessee Kindred Stories of Disability

A collection of stories from individuals with disabilities, families, friends, and disability service providers in Tennessee



11 Stories Found

Showing stories 1 - 11 of 11

Results related to: Adult Services

Jess (25), Down syndrome, Shelby County

That is probably the biggest worry of any parent who has a child with special needs. You want them to outlive you in one sense, but then you wonder what will happen. ”

Danny (55), Other, Shelby County

With him [Danny] being 55-years-old, it’s not like it was when he was born. Now, there’s help. There are programs and suggestions, but when he was born there was nothing.”

Grayson (21), Cerebral Palsy, Cumberland County

After a certain point you say this is what we are. Let’s just be a family and let’s just live.”

Deborah (42), Cerebral Palsy, Shelby County

There’s not too much for people with disabilities to do in Memphis. To me, I think it could be better. ”

Frank (33), Traumatic Brain Injury, Davidson County

Frank always credits the various state and federal programs that have supported him on his new path; the Americans with Disabilities Act, Social Security, Vocational Rehabilitation, Disabled Student Services, and the Federal Workforce Recruitment Program.”

Dylan S (19), Autism, Gibson County

We've been on the wavier list for about 10 years with no help in sight.”

Sharmane (38), Down syndrome, Davidson County

Sharmane is 38 now, and I would love to take her back to those doctors and nurses who told me she wouldn’t be able to accomplish anything, and show them how wrong they were!”

Terry (45), Intellectual Disability, Sumner County

We only found out when my mother died and my brother came to Nashville to live with my brother that he had an intellectual disability. ”

Amanda (21), Other, Weakley County

The state of Tennessee should be ashamed that its most vulnerable citizens are considered unworthy of care and services. ”

Kelly (Age 36), Cerebral Palsy, Wilson County

I wish Kelly had been able to stay in school beyond the age of 22, because there was so little available for her once she got out. ”

Kimberly (Age 24), Cerebral Palsy, Davidson County

It’s like the state just says, 'OK, you’re 21, we forget about you.'”

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