Tennessee Kindred Stories of Disability

A collection of stories from individuals with disabilities, families, friends, and disability service providers in Tennessee



11 Stories Found

Showing stories 1 - 11 of 11

Results related to: Employment / 14 to 21 years

Leo (21), Autism, Davidson County

I am preparing myself to be a successful author by taking classes at Nashville State, planning new books before writing them, and occasionally meeting with writing coaches one-on-one to improve my writing. ”

Adam (18), ADHD, Montgomery County

Through his work, he can share his talent and help others. ”

Justin (19), Intellectual Disability, Williamson County

People started knowing that I had initiative and worked hard. I stood up for myself and let them know the real me. ”

Haley (19), Intellectual Disability, Williamson County

The program teaches me how to live on my own when I am ready to move out of my parents’ house and move into an apartment of my own.”

Danny (19), Intellectual Disability, Davidson County

My goal is to work hard and try my best, I think. I want to maybe get a job someday. ”

Daniel (20), Asperger Syndrome, Rutherford County

The reason that I came to Vanderbilt was to get better, meet new friends, and learn something new.”

Wesley (18), Blind, Smith County

I don’t tell people I’m blind for starters. I don’t feel like it’s something they need to know. Type one people, when they do find out I’m blind, are just like, “Oh okay.” And then there’s type two, who instantly switch to baby mode, like I’m completely helpless. ”

Alex K (17), Blind, Jefferson County

People clearly treated him differently, and at times, it was very frustrating for Alex because he knew he was the same person he was before his diagnosis. ”

Rachel (17), Down syndrome, Davidson County

I wish there was more research on what happens to individuals with a disability once they become adults. It is not very clear what is to be expected after their twenties, and this lack of clarity leaves many families in the dark and scared for their child’s future.”

Dylan (16), Autism, Gibson County

For the last several years I have been unable to keep a job because I have no one to care for him after school, holidays or summer break. My husband works full-time and as of now that is the only income we have to support a family of five. Without my income we have been faced with; utilities, gas, water and phone being cut off. ”

J.T. (Age 18), Autism, Montgomery County

What is helpful to one person with autism is not necessarily workable for another. Therefore, any policy or view that attempts to compartmentalize people with autism may be ineffective. ”

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