Tennessee Kindred Stories of Disability

A collection of stories from individuals with disabilities, families, friends, and disability service providers in Tennessee



44 Stories Found

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Results related to: Employment

Leo (21), Autism, Davidson County

I am preparing myself to be a successful author by taking classes at Nashville State, planning new books before writing them, and occasionally meeting with writing coaches one-on-one to improve my writing. ”

Adam (18), ADHD, Montgomery County

Through his work, he can share his talent and help others. ”

Michael (42), Cerebral Palsy, Knox County

'I’m a people person,' Michael says as he looks over to his long-time friend Jonathan and smiles, 'but I have to have assistance.' ”

Paul (47), Other, Davidson County

He is most worried about being able to retire comfortably, because the extra cost of having a disability is not quite covered by the support he receives from the state alone.”

Rhonda (43), Cerebral Palsy, Davidson County

My goal was to move here, to Nashville, and become totally independent.”

Ryan (29), Autism, Hamilton County

I don’t know who I can turn him over to that I can trust.”

Mario (30), Physical disabilities, Shelby County

Over time, I started to come out of my depression mode and I started to pursue what I wanted in life.”

John Mark (54), Intellectual Disability, Madison County

There was no support for children with disabilities at the time of John Mark’s diagnoses. ”

Matt (23), Down syndrome, Williamson County

I have new friends and new students and I have old friends like Will who I knew a little.”

Justin (19), Intellectual Disability, Williamson County

People started knowing that I had initiative and worked hard. I stood up for myself and let them know the real me. ”

Haley (19), Intellectual Disability, Williamson County

The program teaches me how to live on my own when I am ready to move out of my parents’ house and move into an apartment of my own.”

Danny (19), Intellectual Disability, Davidson County

My goal is to work hard and try my best, I think. I want to maybe get a job someday. ”

Daniel (20), Asperger Syndrome, Rutherford County

The reason that I came to Vanderbilt was to get better, meet new friends, and learn something new.”

Carrie (25), Intellectual Disability, Davidson County

I have a lot of friends in the program. We like to hang out. We go to football games, and basketball games, and stuff like that.”

Bud (24), Other, Williamson County

The thing Next Steps has helped me the most with is help me to realize that I have far more potential than I thought I did in terms of finding a job. ”

Wesley (18), Blind, Smith County

I don’t tell people I’m blind for starters. I don’t feel like it’s something they need to know. Type one people, when they do find out I’m blind, are just like, “Oh okay.” And then there’s type two, who instantly switch to baby mode, like I’m completely helpless. ”

Alex K (17), Blind, Jefferson County

People clearly treated him differently, and at times, it was very frustrating for Alex because he knew he was the same person he was before his diagnosis. ”

Beth (27), Cerebral Palsy, Davidson County

No one is ever going to tell you that they are not going to hire you because you have a disability, but... ”

Pam (56), Muscular dystrophy, Davidson County

Like many of us, Pam’s independence is the most important thing to her. ”

Seth (23), Autism, Williamson County

If Seth had waiver services, everything would change. He would have something to look forward to and something to do. ”