Tennessee Kindred Stories of Disability

A collection of stories from individuals with disabilities, families, friends, and disability service providers in Tennessee



10 Stories Found

Showing stories 1 - 10 of 10

Results related to: Student interview of parent / Autism / Education

Ryan (29), Autism, Hamilton County

I don’t know who I can turn him over to that I can trust.”

David (7), Autism, Davidson County

The closest school and services in Mexico are a day long drive from where we lived. We would not be able to get the services for David if we went back to Mexico.”

Jackson (4), Autism, Rutherford County

The one service [ABA] that has been deemed “optional” and thus not eligible for coverage is the one service most vital to Jackson’s progress.”

Kevin (12), Autism, Shelby County

Kevin is looking forward to working just like anyone else.”

Deshaun (5), Autism, Williamson County

I don’t think we should just settle for our kids learning how to clean their clothes and cook. I want my son to learn what it is to earn a paycheck, to drive, all that stuff.”

Michael (43), Other, Davidson County

My basic hope and prayer is that I outlive my son.”

Morgan (14), Autism, Davidson County

Morgan and Allison each have something unique to offer the world. As parents, we want to do everything we can to help them reach their potential. Our goals for our daughters may be different, but the dream is the same. We want them both to lead happy and fulfilled lives.”

Evan (13), Autism, Davidson County

There is a huge need for teacher training in educating children with autism, and this training is needed both for special education teachers and especially for general education teachers. Also, the State of Tennessee must start helping serve the needs of individuals on the autism spectrum. It is shameful how little our State does to help people on the spectrum to live as full participants in their own communities.”

J.T. (Age 18), Autism, Montgomery County

What is helpful to one person with autism is not necessarily workable for another. Therefore, any policy or view that attempts to compartmentalize people with autism may be ineffective. ”

Joey (Age 13), Autism, Davidson County

When Joey was first diagnosed with autism, I came across an article that said children with autism oftentimes grow up with very few friends. That hurt. I look to his school as a place where he can be with others. When he is out of school, I hope we will find new places where he can be with his peers.”

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