Tennessee Kindred Stories of Disability

A collection of stories from individuals with disabilities, families, friends, and disability service providers in Tennessee



11 Stories Found

Showing stories 1 - 11 of 11

Results related to: Williamson County

Matt (23), Down syndrome, Williamson County

I have new friends and new students and I have old friends like Will who I knew a little.”

Justin (19), Intellectual Disability, Williamson County

People started knowing that I had initiative and worked hard. I stood up for myself and let them know the real me. ”

Haley (19), Intellectual Disability, Williamson County

The program teaches me how to live on my own when I am ready to move out of my parents’ house and move into an apartment of my own.”

Bud (24), Other, Williamson County

The thing Next Steps has helped me the most with is help me to realize that I have far more potential than I thought I did in terms of finding a job. ”

Patrick (23), Pervasive Developmental Disorder not otherwise specified (PDD-NOS), Williamson County

The main goal that Dena has set for Patrick is for him to become as self-sufficient as possible. ”

Seth (23), Autism, Williamson County

If Seth had waiver services, everything would change. He would have something to look forward to and something to do. ”

Deshaun (5), Autism, Williamson County

I don’t think we should just settle for our kids learning how to clean their clothes and cook. I want my son to learn what it is to earn a paycheck, to drive, all that stuff.”

Nate (13), Autism, Williamson County

Nate served communion. And I saw the true face of God.”

Eric (23), Down syndrome, Williamson County

If it doesn’t seem right, I don’t care who’s telling you, if it’s not right, you make it right. You have to make it work. You do whatever you need to do. You need to always understand what your rights are and what your child's rights are, or else you may get short changed.”

Evan (13), Autism, Davidson County

There is a huge need for teacher training in educating children with autism, and this training is needed both for special education teachers and especially for general education teachers. Also, the State of Tennessee must start helping serve the needs of individuals on the autism spectrum. It is shameful how little our State does to help people on the spectrum to live as full participants in their own communities.”

Tripp (Age 21), Intellectual Disability, Williamson County

From this point on, I want you to remember that it’s your job to prepare Tripp for the path, because you cannot prepare the path for Tripp. ”